I don’t like cosplaying as a hobby.

While I was preparing for my Japanese studies as an incoming middle schooler, … I discovered cosplaying and a plethora of other Japanese stuff like anime, manga, gyaru (girl) style, visual kei style, …………

Anime and manga fans who cosplay – dress up as their favorite characters – were such “eye-candies” to me as a kid. The homemade or “professionally-made” costumes they wore were much more colorful, detailed, and unique compared to the Halloween costumes you’d see at your local party stores.

But soon after discovering the hobby, I realized that cosplaying is far from glamorous.

Continue reading “I don’t like cosplaying as a hobby.”

YouTube Hypes Up Fans with “Premiere”

YouTube will introduce a new feature called “Premiere” for content creators to upload ready-made videos and set its premiere date and time for it to be playable.

Users will be able to see the premiere date and time, set a reminder (which I assume will pop-up from their bell icon on the top-right corner of their YouTube desktop page, and pop-up as a notification on the phone), and chat with each other in a chatroom.

The “Premiere” feature is similar to YouTube’s “Livestream” feature.

In fact, there are content creators who use the “Livestream” feature to broadcast video premieres; they would have an on-screen stand-by message or countdown clock for users to see when the actual livestreaming will happen. The problem with premiering videos through the “Livestream” feature is, of course, the fact that users can assume that they can instantly watch the premiere of a video when they see the livestream indicator next to the video’s thumbnail.

The “Premiere” feature has its own set of problems as well. There’s no countdown clock to excite fans who are eagerly anticipating content to be uploaded, and the total number of views for a video are hidden. The latter issue is the biggest issue of the two because there are fans who are concerned about how many views a video gets within 24-hours after its premiere. I’m assuming that YouTube hid that information so that users don’t confuse the number of total viewers with it.

One thing that isn’t specified in YouTube’s overview of the “Preview” feature is how long the chatroom will be active. Some of you probably think that the chatroom will disappear as soon as the video is playable.

The problem with the comments section is that it’s automatically set to display top comments. Because of that, it feels like there’s not much engagement going on until you switch the view to “Newest first”.

Capture

Suppose the chatroom remains active during the video’s first 24-hours of being posted. If the chatroom and comments section are going to be available at the same time during that 24-hour window, then they can help promote engagement on YouTube. Seeing comments pouring into the chatroom makes users feel like they’re part of a large and excited fan group, which in turn makes them wanna really appreciate the content they’re gonna see. If users don’t like seeing the chatroom, then it would be cool if they can disable the chatroom so that they can enjoy reading the comments section instead for longer and more thoughtful messages.

Some content creators such as Etika (seen in the video above) switch between YouTube and Twitch.

Twitch doesn’t have a “Premiere” feature like YouTube, but it’s “Livestream” feature is much more attractive and customizable because it supports the use of extensions. Extensions come in different styles and functionalities. Anyone can make extensions. And, most importantly, they can be viewed by mobile and desktop viewers.

YouTube’s annotation buttons aren’t really attractive on videos.  In fact…

As of May 2017, the annotations editor has been discontinued. This means you can no longer add new or edit existing annotations, only delete them. You can continue to see reporting data for your existing annotations.

The reason why some content creators prefer livestreaming on Twitch instead of YouTube is because of YouTube’s unusable annotations feature and the fact that it’s mostly a place for people to watch videos, and not so much to actively engage with other users.

Small and successful content creators have learned that livestreams and chatrooms are essential to maintaining, growing, and engaging with an audience.

Promoting the chatroom and notification features may increase traffic on YouTube, but YouTube has so many unresolved issues that make the YouTube experience kinda bad.

Have you ever noticed that there are users who consistently get their comments featured? Or bots? Self-advertisers? YouTube gamer and vlogger PewDiePie has an infamous video called “Goodbye Comments.” that addresses the annoyances that those spammers bring. Despite how that video was posted in 2014, the issue continues to remain at large.

Will chatrooms be another place for people and bots to spam comments? It’s very possible to employ chatbots to create the illusion of chatroom flooding.

Will YouTube’s “Premiere” feature be successful and functional? I highly doubt that celebrities will rely on this feature to promote their channels. Content creators that have a reasonably large fanbase and/or enjoy producing episodes and skits like WongFu Productions can certainly benefit from this feature.